The 2019 Heinrich Böll Memorial Weekend takes place from Friday 3rd to Sunday 5th May. Scroll down for draft itinerary.

View / Download 2019 Draft Programme (PDF document)

Tickets for the full weekend, or individual events, can be purchased online from the ‘Weekend 2019 Tickets’ link on heinrichboellcottage.com.

For more info please contact:

Email: hbollachill@anu.ie

Tel: 087-772-0192


Friday 3rd May

Registration
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
7pm

Official Opening: H.E. Deike Potzel: Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Germany
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
7.30pm
Official Opening by Deike Potzel, Ambassador of the Federal Republic Of Germany in Ireland. 1987 – 1992 Foreign Service Academy of the Federal Foreign Ministry, Bonn. English and French Language and Literature Studies, Humboldt University Berlin. Since 2017 Ambassador, German Embassy, Dublin, Ireland / 2014-2017 Deputy Director-General for Central Services, Foreign Ministry, Berlin / 2012-2014 Head of the Personal Office of Federal President Joachim Gauck/ 2008- 2012/Deputy Head of Division for Personal, Staff Development and Planning, Foreign Ministry, Berlin.
Followed by presentation of Essay Prizes by Ambassador Deike Potzel.

Address by Dr. Ellen Ueberschär, President of the Heinrich Boell Foundation Berlin
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
8.15pm
As president of the Heinrich Böll Foundation she is responsible for the Foundation’s German activities, for foreign and security policy, and for the Europe and North America regional work. In addition, she is in charge of the scholarship department, of the Green Academy (a think tank of scientists and politicians), as well as of the archive “Grünes Gedächtnis” (green memory), a contemporary historical archive collecting materials relating to the Green party and the new social movements.

Lecture Garett Cormicon: “Camille Souter’s paintings of Mayo”
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
9.00pm
Camille Souter’s very early paintings of Achill from the 1950s, her paintings of sharks from the 1960s, paintings of the landscape and various items washed upon the shore (eg Jellyfish, dead seals and sheep carcasses) paintings inspired by events like Bonfires, The Achill Wedding, the Achill Christmas, the Storm at the Dock or paintings addressing local environmental issues such as: the Rape of the Achill Quarry And or Alternative Land Use. Wider Mayo area such as “On the Train to Claremorris” and or Beyond Geesala Near Belmullet to show how she travelled around. Garrett Cormican is the author of the critically acclaimed 337 page monograph Camille Souter: The Mirror in the Sea, published by Whytes in 2006 and is a freelance lecturer and curator. Assistant Curator of the Francis Bacon Studio and Database Project, The Dublin City Gallery, The Hugh Lane from 1999-2001. Was on the Board of the College Gallery, Trinity College Dublin. Wrote the introductory essay for Camille’s show at the Linenhall in 1999 and was the Artist’s Biographer for her show at the Model Arts and Neiland Centre and RHA in 2001.

Reception
The Strand Hotel, Dugort
10pm

Saturday 4th May

Guided Walk
Dooega Head: Guided walk in landscape with readings with Eoin Halpin
Meet at Dooega beach car park, 10am
Eoin Halpin is the Operations Manager with Archaeology and Heritage Consultancy Ltd a company founded in 2014. For the previous 25 years he worked with Archaeological Development Services Ltd, and before that for the Scottish Office in Edinburgh. Eoin has worked on all aspects of development led archaeological projects. He has project managed numerous large infrastructural schemes for example, the North-South Gas Pipeline and the A1-N1 road scheme. He is a member of the Chartered Institute for Field Archaeologists and a member of the Institute of Archaeologist of Ireland for which he has acted as chairperson. His work has appeared in numerous publications in academic journals, historic society journals and monographs.

Lunch
Lavelle’s Seaside House, Dooega.
1pm

A Poet’s Pathway with Martin Dyar
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
2pm
Martin Dyar grew up in Swinford in County Mayo. His book of poems Maiden Names (Arlen House), described by Bernard O’Donoghue as ‘a thrilling new development in Irish poetry’ was shortlisted for the Pigott Poetry Prize, and was a book of the year selection in both the Guardian and the Irish Times. stimulate audience members with regard to their own reading and writing; Writers workshop insights into technique, creative process and the deeper significance of poetry; language as used by a selection of writers with respect to landscape: mountains and rivers in particular: framed in writers background and writing life.

Gisela Holfter & Bettina Migge: “Ireland in the European Eye”
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
3pm
This book developed in the context of the work of the Royal Irish Academy committee, Language, Literature, Culture and Communication (2014-2018). The focus on European awareness of Ireland emerged organically from one of the committee’s central preoccupations, the place of European languages and literatures in Ireland. However, since literature is only one of the cultural areas that have contributed to shaping Ireland’s relationship with the rest of Europe, the focus of the collection extends to other closely related domains such as the Arts, Architecture, Politics and European Studies to bring to the fore a more rounded picture of Ireland’s relationship with continental Europe. The book is divided into four parts. The first part, “Ireland in Europe: Historical Background and Contextualisation”, presents historical overviews and a contextualisation of Ireland’s relations with the other European countries. The second part, “Ireland in Europe: Representations of Ireland in European Literature and Irish Literature in Europe”, discusses how Ireland is represented in European literatures and provides a historical contextualisation. The third part, “Ireland in Europe: Irish Art, Architecture, Film and Music in European Discourses”, analyses Ireland’s representation in the European context from a broader cultural perspective. The final part, “Ireland in Europe: European Studies, Tourism and Journalism” zooms in on the marketing of Ireland to different European markets, developments in European Studies and, turning the tables, analysing European discourses in Irish media.

Gisela Holfter studied in Cologne, Cambridge and St. Louis, and worked as an Assistant She is Senior Lecturer in German and co-founder and Joint Director of the Centre for Irish-German Studies. Her research interests include German-Irish relations, German literature (19th century to contemporary writing), exile studies, migration and intercultural communication. Co-edited a dozen books, the latest being German Reunification and the Legacy of GDR Literature and Culture (2018, Brill) and (WVT 2019; both books edited with D. Byrnes and J. Conacher). Her monographs include Erlebnis Irland (1996, WVT), Heinrich Böll and Ireland (2011, paperback 2012, CBS) and An Irish Sanctuary: German-speaking Refugees in Ireland 1933-1945 (with H. Dickel, 2017, paperback 2018, de Gruyter). She is currently engaged in a project on Fontane’s Wanderungen durch die Mark Brandenburg with contemporary German writers (Verlag BerlinBrandenburg, 2019) and one on German migration to Ireland since 1922 (Palgrave 2020).

Bettina Migge studied in Hamburg, Yaoundé (Cameroon) and Berlin and received a PhD in Linguistics from the Ohio State University. She worked as Hochschulassistentin at the JohannWolfgang Goethe Universität, Frankfurt am Main and is currently Professor of Linguistics, Head of the School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics at University College Dublin and a member of the research group Structure et Dynamique des Langues (SeDyL UMR 8202) in Villejuif, France. Her research interests are in the broad area of language contact, language documentation, sociolinguistics. Empirically her research has focused on the Americas, specifically the Creoles of Suriname and French Guiana, and on migration to and language in Ireland. Her publications include book length studies Exploring Language in a Multilingual Context: Variation, Interaction and Ideology in Language Documentation (with I. Léglise, 2013, CUP) and edited volumes Support, Transmission, Education and Target Varieties in the Celtic languages (with N. Ó Murchadha 2017, Routledge), New Perspectives on Irish English (with M. Ní Chiosáin, 2012, John Benjamins). She is currently engaged in a multi-year participatory dictionary project in French Guiana.

Readings by Leif Randt.
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
4.00pm
Leif Randt was born in FrankfurtMain / Germany in 1983. He is a writer of prose. His latest novel “Planet Magnon” deals with a solar system far away where people live in aesthetic collectives under a government run by an artificial intelligence. The novel was adapted for theatre and is about to be adapted into a TV-series in 2018.He has been one of the stylistic authors of the younger generation since his highly acclaimed novel “Schimmernder Dunst über Coby County” (2011). His prose has won numerous prizes, including the Nicolas Born debut prize (2010), the Ingeborg Bachmann competition with the Ernst Willner Prize (2011), the Düsseldorfer Literaturpreis (2012), and a scholarship from the Villa Aurora Los Angeles. Leif took part in residency programs in Los Angeles, USA (2013) and Kyoto, Japan (2016). In 2015, he wrote a travel log about Indonesia. He is co-founder of “Tegel Media”, a web-label for contemporary text- and video-content (tegelmedia.net).

Reading by Martin Dyar
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
4.30pm
With the composer Ryan Molloy, Martin Dyar has written a poetry song cycle for soprano harp and flute, which toured nationally in 2018. Martin has also written a play, Tom Loves a Lord, about the Irish poet Thomas Moore. Martin won the Patrick Kavanagh Award in 2009, and the Strokestown International Poetry Award in 2001. A graduate of NUI Galway, and Trinity College Dublin, where he did a PhD in English Literature, and taught for ten years in TCD’s School of Medicine, he has held fellowships at the University of Iowa, and at the Washington Ireland Program. His work has been added to the Leaving Cert prescribed poetry syllabus, and chosen for a number of anthologies, including Windharp: Poems of Ireland Since 1916 (Penguin Ireland), and Reading the Future (Hodges Figgis). Martin is currently Associate Writer Fellow at the University of Limerick, where he teaches poetry on UL’s MA in Creative Writing. Martin’s next collection of poems, Burke’s Goddess, will be published by Arlen House in Autumn 2019.

Reading by Hugo Hamilton / Book launch: “Dublin Palms”
Cyril Gray Memorial Hall, Dugort
5pm
The narrator of Dublin Palms has returned to Dublin to set up home with his partner Helen and their two children. Their lives are filled with optimism, but also by a sense of dislocation. Overshadowed by the Troubles in the North, their family enterprise begins to come apart. As the creditors line up to be paid, they must consider leaving everything behind. What will they gain when they stand to lose all? In this spectacular novel from the author of The Speckled People, a family tries to hold on in a falling world. A powerful story of fragmentation and belonging, of emigrants and strangers and people returning home. … “The palm trees give the street a holiday atmosphere. There must be something in the soil they like. They have straight leaves that get a bit ragged, with split ends. At night you hear them rattling in the wind …”
Hugo Hamilton was born in Co. Dublin where he still lives. His father, an ardent Irish nationalist, forbade his children to speak English at home, while his German mother, scarred by her own traumatic experience of the Second World War, preached the need for reconciliation. Hamilton left Ireland for Germany in the 1970s and only returned to Dublin in the mid 1980s. His first three novels, Surrogate City (1990), The Last Shot (1991), winner of the Rooney Prize for Irish Literature, and The Love Test (1996), are set in Germany and bear testimony to a changing society still haunted by the past. The Speckled People (2003) and The Sailor in the Wardrobe (2006), in turn, are informed by an acute awareness of the historical, dimensions of his Irish-German inheritance and to many critics offered a long overdue revision of the terms ‘identity’, ‘cultural diversity’, and ‘Irish’.

The Delmaine String Quartet present Love and War: Words and Music from the Western Front.
St. Thomas’s Church, Dugort
8pm
To commemorate the centenary of The First World War in 1914, Bewley’s Cafe Theatre and the Delmaine String Quartet have collaborated on a special programme of words and music reflecting the human experience of the Western Front. Featured prominently are the letters of Artillery Officer, Eric Appleby, to his Athlone sweetheart, Phyllis Kelly. In this moving correspondence, he records the discomforts, horrors, banalities and humour of trench life as he yearns to be back with his beloved in a world at peace. Phyllis was a talented singer and the performance will include several of the popular songs of the period with string quartet accompaniment. Threaded through this extraordinary love story are some of the great works from the famous generation of World War One soldier poets and composers. In addition, a varied programme of poetry and prose will be featured, with music by Bach, Ravel, Moeran, Dvorak, Schubert & others. The performers are Michael James Ford, Susannah De Wrixon, Elliot Moriarty and the Delmaine String Quartet.

Sunday 5th May

Guided Walk
Guided walk in landscape with readings with Eoin Halpin
Meet at car park at rear of Mulranny Park Hotel, Mulranny.
10.00am
Eoin Halpin is the Operations Manager with Archaeology and Heritage Consultancy Ltd a company founded in 2014. For the previous 25 years he worked with Archaeological Development Services Ltd, and before that for the Scottish Office in Edinburgh. Eoin has worked on all aspects of development led archaeological projects. He has project managed numerous large infrastructural schemes for example, the North-South Gas Pipeline and the A1-N1 road scheme. He is a member of the Chartered Institute for Field Archaeologists and a member of the Institute of Archaeologist of Ireland for which he has acted as chairperson. His work has appeared in numerous publications in academic journals, historic society journals and monographs.

Lunch
1pm

Reading by Moya Cannon
Moya Cannon is originally from Co. Donegal, she has spent most of her adult life in Galway and now lives in Dublin. She has represented Ireland at many international festivals and conferences, in Japan, India, the US and many European and South American countries. Her work has been widely translated. She studied History and Politics at University College Dublin and International Relations at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. A native speaker of Irish, for many years she taught adolescent traveller children. She has taught creative writing at the National University of Ireland, Galway and was director of the International Writers’ Course at NUIG. A winner of the Brendan Behan award and of the Lawrence O Shaughnessy award, she has edited Poetry Ireland Review and was 2011 Heimbold Professor of Irish Studies at Villanova University. She is a member of Aosdana, the Irish affiliation of creative artists. She has a deep interest in music and enjoys performing with musicians.